Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander commitment

We support reconciliation, deliver research and educational opportunities, and create an environment which values and celebrates Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ knowledge, culture and heritage.

Leading reconciliation

We are deeply committed to reconciliation, and our Elevate Reconciliation Action Plan ensures Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, knowledge and perspectives are included within learning, teaching and professional practices across the University.

Through our Indigenous Australian governance framework [.pdf 195KB], Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics, senior staff and leaders across Curtin work with community members to shape our strategic direction, policy and curriculum. Our Office of the Elder-in-Residence, led by Nyungar Cultural Advisor Ingrid Cumming, guides and coordinates our professional development, training, initiatives and curriculum for staff, students and the wider community.

We are proud to support the profound Uluru Statement from the Heart, a critical step to formally embracing our shared history and walking together towards a better future for all Australians – one that is based on self-determination and justice.

Creating opportunities

Through our aspiration-raising activities in the community, we facilitate pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander school students to access higher education.

We are also committed to increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed at Curtin, from student placement roles through to senior academic and professional appointments.

Supporting students

Our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students can access a range of customised support services to help them settle in and succeed at Curtin and in their future careers, including tutoring, counselling, work placements, financial assistance and Curtin Student Guild representation.

Developing capabilities

Our goal is for all Curtin students to graduate with cross-cultural capability and have an applied understanding of local First Peoples’ katajininy warniny (translated from the Nyungar language as ‘ways of being, knowing and doing’). To achieve this, we have strived to ‘Indigenise’ our curriculum, immersing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge, practices and perspectives throughout.

Guiding our capabilities development is our Indigenous Australian Cultural Capabilities Framework, which offers powerful and authentic education and training experiences around Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural practices, knowledge and history. This includes our On Country experiences, which enable students and staff to join Aboriginal Elders on country and learn about the historical and contemporary issues affecting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We also offer customised education and training to industry and community organisations.

Celebrating culture and heritage

Our students and staff are immersed in an environment that acknowledges and values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. Aboriginal artwork and Nyungar words and phrases are featured across our campuses and digital presences, and we hold events and celebrations for significant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander dates throughout the year, including NAIDOC week and Reconciliation Week.

The golden road drawing

Carrolup Centre for Truth-telling

We aim to establish the Carrolup Centre for Truth-telling, which will provide a permanent home for rare and precious artworks by children of the Stolen Generations so they can be easily accessed by members of the Nyungar and wider community.

IMAGE: Once known child artist, The Golden Road c1949, pastel on paper, 280mm x 385mm. The Herbert Mayer Collection of Carrolup Artwork, Curtin University Art Collection. Gift of Colgate University, USA, 2013. Image reproduced with permission of the Carrolup Elders Reference Group.

The Yarning Circle

The Yarning Circle

Located on our Perth campus, the Yarning Circle is a circular rammed earth seating and large steel canopy which provides the Curtin and wider communities a space to pause, meet, reflect and yarn within an Aboriginal space.